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Why Your Employer Branding Efforts are Going in Vein?

Hanna Wilson, HR tech Outlook APAC | Tuesday, June 01, 2021

One of the main reasons for employer brand failure is that the company did not establish a strong enough employer value proposition (EVP) for candidates.

Fremont, CA: A strong employer brand plays an important role in attracting, recruiting, and retaining great talent in a comparative market. An employer brand refers to the reputation of a company from the perception of its existing employees. Employer branding includes the formal efforts of HR pros and recruitment and marketers as well as more informal elements of employee word-of-mouth and online reviews. A poor employer brand can affect the company in multiple ways, such as a high rate of employee turnover, difficulty in hiring skilled talents, and more.

Let us look at why an employer brand may fail?

Corporate Brand and Employer Brand Are Not Same

While creating an employer brand, organizations sometimes mistake it for corporate much. It is important to note that the corporate brand and employer brand are not the same things. The corporate brand is designed for consumers, not candidates, and the employer brand is for employees. Hence, the language and tone would be different. The message should come from another place. Through employer branding, the company is not selling services or products. Rather, the company is selling the idea of devoting time as well as hard work to a company that matches the values of candidates.

Not Providing Enough Marketing Support to HR

Though HR pros understand some aspects of marketing, this is not their primary job. Hence, they often seek help from the marketing team. On the other hand, the marketing team is busy selling things, and they do not have enough time to train HR on the best way to create an employer brand.

Weak EVP

One of the main reasons for employer brand failure is that the company did not establish a strong enough employer value proposition (EVP) for candidates. This has to be authentic, relevant to what candidates are looking for, and also successful in terms of producing positive results. Calling the company culture its EVP is the worst thing employers can do.

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